Tech-i-ya 2.5 Reply

Adrian Durlester

A while back, I saw an online tip about resources for creating certificates for students. As I was reading it, I thought to myself, how 20th century. Paper certificates in this day and age? Kill more trees so students can bring home paper certificates which will just get stuffed away, or lost, or thrown out? It just didn’t make sense to me, so I began to wonder what people in Jewish education could be doing to recognize student achievement in a more digital fashion. If one looks at the secular educational world, one approach that is gaining traction is using digital badges. A digital badge “is a symbol or indicator of an accomplishment, skill, quality or interest. From the Boy and Girl Scouts, to PADI diving instruction, to the more recently popular geo-location game, Foursquare, badges have been successfully used to set goals, motivate behaviors, represent achievements and communicate success in many contexts. A “digital badge” is an online record of achievements, tracking the recipient’s communities of interaction that issued the badge and the work completed to get it. Digital badges can support connected learning environments by motivating learning and signaling achievement both within particular communities as well as across communities and institutions.” (Source: Open Badges for Lifelong Learning)

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Tech-i-ya 2.4 2

Adrian Durlester

Pinterest! That’s the latest rage. (Well, as the ads say, that may be so 27 seconds ago.)

Pinterest is yet another variation on the “social bookmarking” application theme, but unlike previous attempts at similar services, Pinterest is catching on because it is so easy to use. There are tools like Diigo, Delicious, Evernote and many more that attempt to extend the value and usability of all the bookmarks/favorites you collect in your wanderings of the the web. Pinterest is a great way to do this with more of a visual component.

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Tech-i-ya 2.2 Reply

By Adrian Durlester

One of the best blog posts I’ve read recently is Steve Jobs, Apple, and Jewish Education: Can we Imagine the I-Thou Phone? by Rabbi Daniel Lehman on E Jewish Philanthropy. In the opening to his post, he cites a quote from a blog post on the same site written in mid-August by Johnathan Woocher entitled Reinventing Jewish Education which has become one of my favorite quotes of all time: “Jewish education today is using a walkman, while the world is listening to iPods.” Both blog posts are well worth the time to read them. I happen to agree with both authors – whether you agree or disagree with their points, they are certainly worthy of discussion. Rabbi Lehman makes a powerful case for finding the balance between embracing the technology and remembering that finding those Buberian relationship moments is paramount.

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Tech-i-ya 2.1 Reply

Adrian Durlester

So what does it mean to be a 21st century educator? This wiki on the 21st Century Teacher, highlighted by the good folks over at Edutopia  helps you to discover the answer. It appears on Edutopia, in their feature “Twenty Tidbits for New Teachers,” which is a worthwhile read for experienced teachers as well. Another tip on the site which I highly endorse is their recommendation thsat teachers star bloggin. It is an incredibly useful tool for professional and personal reflection as an educator.

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